Tag Archive | andrew lo

In Defense of Market Timing – a study that will shock you!

SmartStops comment :  As we dig up other studies we’ll add to article.  

Missing Best and Worst Days in Stock Market 1984-1998

 The article was originally published in 2008.    

SmartStops  comment  on 08/4/11:    Markets have dropped 9% in last nine days with the whole debt ceiling “show” going on in U.S.  government.   Do you think you needed to have given back your gains?   Think again!

Market timing is the art of making investment decisions using indicators and strategies to observe and determine the direction of prices. Many believe that market timing involves predicting the future, when in reality, the goal of market timing is to participate in periods of price strength and avoid periods of price weakness.

The general investing public has been told that market timing is a high risk proposition. Most of what has been written about the topic focuses on its failure and the risk investors take when trying to time the market. A typical study focuses only on the negative consequences of missing a few particular up days in the market – calculating the negative financial impact of missing those days and concluding that attempting to time the market is foolish. The biggest fallacy with these studies is    Read More…

VIX, Fear and maintaining Intelligent Protection

NEW:  SmartStops has just released its SmartStops Risk Barometer Indicator (SRBI) .   Click here  to check it out and let us know what you think.
 
SmartStops comment:    Why wait for VIX to go above a 200 day moving average in order to keep yourself protected?    There is a better way with SmartStops.

Are VIX ETFs Breaking Out?          originally published at ETFTrends  

Some traders have been keeping a close eye on the CBOE Volatility Index as a possible “tell” that the rally in risk assets since March 2009 may be due for a breather.

That’s why the VIX’s move above its 200-day moving average Wednesday drew the attention of investors with a technical bent.

The index, which measures the implied volatility of options contracts on the S&P 500, has been relatively subdued during the market’s recent rocky stretch. The benchmark is known as Wall Street’s favorite fear gauge.

However, the VIX was up 18% in the final hour of U.S. trading Wednesday to its highest level since March.

The largest exchange traded product following VIX futures, iPath S&P 500 VIX Short-Term Futures ETN (NYSEArca: VXX), rose 8%.

In stock ETFs, a Nasdaq-100 fund was pushed below a key indicator in Wednesday’s sell-off. [Nasdaq ETF Lower]

CBOE Volatility Index

VIX

The Next Crash Could Be Alot Worse

Lots of pessimism since QE2 is deemed a failure and no QE3 is coming.   Here’s one article that reminds us to ensure we are risk aware and maintain an intelligently adusting protection strategy.     Posted at Seeking Alpha by Michael T. Synder   http://seekingalpha.com/article/274478-the-next-crash-could-be-a-lot-worse

The Next Crash Could Be Alot Worse

here’s a lot of emotion in this market at the moment, and the conversations among traders are nearly all leaning toward the bear side

So what are some of the signs that this downturn on Wall Street may turn into a full-blown crash?

Well, according to the Wall Street Journal, junk bonds are being sold off at an alarming rate right now. Does the following quote from the Journal remind anyone of 2008 at least a little bit?….

A steep decline in prices of bonds backed by subprime mortgages has spread through the riskiest segments of the credit markets, ending rallies in high-yield corporate bonds and commercial real-estate debt.

Also, many of the big Wall Street banks are already laying off workers. In a previous article I wrote about the potential for Wall Street to go into “panic mode“, I noted that Goldman Sachs (GS), Bank of America (BAC), JPMorgan Chase (JPM) and Morgan Stanley (MS) are all laying people off or are considering staff cuts.

The truth is that the big banks on Wall Street are not nearly as stable as most people think that they are. Moody’s recently warned that it may downgrade the debt ratings of Bank of America, Citigroup and Wells Fargo.

Another major story on Wall Street right now is oil. OPEC recently announced that oil production levels will not be raised, even though the price of oil has been hovering around $100 a barrel.

World oil supplies are very tight right now. In fact, the globe actually consumed 5 million barrels per day more oil than it produced during 2010. This was possible because the difference was apparently made up by drawing down reserves.

But if oil supplies are this tight already, what is going to happen if a major war (as opposed to all of the minor wars that are already happening) erupts in the Middle East?

The world is sitting on the edge of a financial disaster.

Read More…

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